Spirals Everywhere Blanket

Wool Monkey Crochet Spirals Blanket

Sometimes it’s a great idea to ask your kids what they think you should make next and sometimes it backfires, big time.

I made the mistake of asking my girls if they would like it if I made them a blanket each. I told them that it could be their own choice, unique to them.  Of course they said yes and then promptly told me what sort of blankets they would like.  The youngest requested spirals.  Spirals!  Once my brain had recovered from the panic of wondering how I was going to do spirals I naturally said yes, of course you can have spirals.

Hmmmm.  Spirals.  How shall I do spirals. Hmmmmm.  Spirals.   (This is how I spent the next day or so, pondering spirals).Woolly Crochet Spiral Blanket

After several attempts, and lots of frogging, I finally had a spiral in a square and a set of colours chosen by my 5 year old that would hopefully work. All I had to do now was create 23 more spirals!

I must admit, it doesn’t look very good does it.

Since then, I have been spiralling everywhere.

Crocheting Spirals with coffee and cake

 

 

Spirals in the cafe, with coffee and cake.
(This is my favourite type of spiral)

 

Crochet Spiral Blanket

 

 

Spirals at the sports hall during my kids gymnastics lessons. (It makes the lessons go really quick)

 

Crochet Spiral Blanket

 

 

Spirals sat at my desk, when I am supposed to be working.  (ooops)

Crochet Spiral Blanket

 

 

 

 

Spirals in the pub.   (Why not?)

 

 

Crochet Spiral Blanket

 

 

 

Spirals sat on the sofa at home.  (This is where most of them get done. I don’t actually have that much of a social life)

 

Crochet Spiral Blanket

 

 

 

Spirals in a coffee shop.  Again.

 

I think you probably get the idea by now that I have been doing spirals everywhere I have been recently.

I have been trying to get one done everyday, so that it didn’t become a burden and I still had time for other projects.

 

My youngest was pretty pleased last week with how her spirals were looking.  Everytime I add to the pile she lays them all out on the floor.  She says she is planning how they are going to fit together.  Hmmm.

Woolly Crochet Spiral Blanket

 

Four weeks later and I have a large pile of square spirals.  Now begins the bit that I don’t really feel like doing – sewing them all together.   Grrrrrr.

Wool Monkey Crochet Spirals Blanket

 We laid them all out on the bed, trying to arrange them in such a way that meant all the colours were evenly spread out.  This is trickier than you might imagine.  Then, after a little deliberation I decided to use the slip stitch method to join all the squares together.  It gives a nice neat edge to all the squares and is fairly quick.  (Always a good thing).

Once they were all joined together, all that  remained was the edging. Several rounds of edging as it turned out, but nevermind, I thought it finished it off nicely and sometimes it’s worth putting a bit of extra effort into the edging on a large blanket.

Here it is, the finished blanket.  My daughter loves it and has used it on her bed every night.  I was worth the effort I reckon.

 

 

If you’re interested in creating your own spiral blanket, then the pattern is available on Etsy:

https://www.etsy.com/uk/listing/557964737/

Blanket Sizes

Blankets

I have often been asked the question ‘how much yarn do I need for a blanket?’  To which, of course, there is only one reply, ‘depends how big your blanket is going to be’.

Then of course the next question is usually, ‘how big does my blanket need to be?’  Sounds silly, but there are no fixed rules about how big a blanket should be, just make it to the size you want.

OK, so that sounds like a bit of a slack answer I know.

I have done a little bit of digging to find out what sort of sizes people generally consider to be standard.  Or standard-ish at least. Some people have their own personal set of sizes that they tend to work to and others like to make it up at random.  I know I have a rough guide in my head and I tend to vary it depending upon the project.

One thing to bear in mind, if you are making a blanket for a bed, UK bed sizes and US bed sizes are different!

Baby Blankets

So most of you will have at some point made a baby blanket I suspect.  The sizes do vary a little bit, but most of them out there seem to fit into the same categories and approximate sizes.

 

Adult Blankets

Not necessarily for adults, but it just gives a different category from babies.  These can vary quite a bit more, especially between the continents! So, I had a look at the bed sizes first as the standards seem to vary slightly.  Here is a comparison between the USA and the UK.  Obviously there are many other variations around the World, but there is a limit to how many I can list and these two seem to be pretty common.

 

When it comes to the blanket sizes, as oppose to the actual bed sizes there seems to be a lot more discrepancy as to how a blanket should fit a bed.  Should it just reach the edges?  Should it overlap the edges and drape down the sides?  Should the top be long enough to cover the pillows? Is it just a decorative thing?

I still believe it’s all just personal preference.  There are no right and wrongs, but here are some guidelines to what appear to be the most common blanket sizes out there.  Most of them allow for some drape over the sides of the bed.  This is NOT a definitive answer as to the size a blanket should be, NOR is it an instruction that you must create your blankets this size.  It is simply what my research has found…

 

I hope these help some of you a little bit.  If not my advice when making blankets is to make them big and just keep going until you’ve had enough of making it and then it’s big enough.

 

 
There are loads of lovely books containing patterns for blankets out there, but these are a couple of my favourites: (click on them to look inside and check out the latest prices)

Knit and Chatterers

Here is just a quick post in celebration of the Wool Monkey knit and chatterers.

(I call them chatterers as they always have plenty to say and being quiet is definitely not one of their strong points).

The groups started when I originally opened the Wool Monkey shop. They started small in number but have grown in strength since.  New members join from time to time, which keeps the group growing and keeps adding fresh ideas and new impetus.   We have had many, many giggles, some cracking outings and some great gatherings.

   

These were from last years Xmas knit and chat, in the pub.  The ladies are such great sports considering that I made them all knit with toilet paper, followed by a knit behind your back competition.

There are two knit and chat groups these days, Saturday evening and Tuesday mornings, both of which have continued long after the Wool Monkey shop has closed. They really are a great bunch of ladies.  A somewhat eclectic mixture without a doubt, but very caring and very supportive of each other.

knit-and-chat-cubley-hall

They go on outings together, (almost always involving some kind of woolly event of course), they’ve helped me yarn bomb on the odd occasion, they teach and inspire each other and they looked after me when I had to close my shop.

 

Oh, and they’re always up for showing off their knitting!

So, thank you ladies for being such a fab group, let’s keep it going.  I am looking forward to seeing what sort of stuff we can get up to next year!

closing-day

If you are interested in joining our knit and chat groups, do get in touch so we can let you know where we are meeting, newcomers are always very welcome.

You don’t need to know how to knit or crochet to join, we will teach you…

 

 

Crochet Mitts Madness

Well, the time finally arrived for the first Craft Creme workshop.  I spent the whole day waiting for this workshop, mainly as I was really looking forward to a piece of cake from the Cafe.  (Karen does do exceedingly good cakes).  Of course I was looking forward to seeing a few faces I haven’t seen for ages too and getting stuck into a bit of crochet.

I must admit I didn’t know how exactly many people were going to turn up, so I just bagged up as much yarn as I could carry, with hopefully enough hooks and patterns.

I thought, foolishly, that I would get to savour my piece of cake and have a nice coffee before anyone turned up.  I should have known better really.  I knew Pat would turn up early, she always does.  (It’s nice to see her eagerness though and it’s been such a long while that I have missed it).  After that, they just kept coming…

We had  a full room!  It was a little bit hard trying to juggle the number of absolute beginners we had all in one go, but they did all go home crocheting. In a fashion.  You all worked sooooo hard, I was very impressed.  I think I need to spend more time teaching some folks,  mentioning no names (Ja***  ), but that’s fine, we can work on it.  I hope they will come and find me if they need a bit of extra help and there is always the knit and chat sessions, where you can get help and continue to learn.karens-mitt

I know some of you will have gone home and finished your first mitt straight away.

Here is the first one I have received a picture of this morning.   Suprise, surprise it’s Karen’s and it looks fab!

So, who’s gonna be the first to fnish a complete pair I wonder?  (Not counting mine, I’ve already done several).

I’m going to hopefully get around to posting some beginner crochet notes on the tutorials page over the next couple of days, to help those of you who have only just started, so, watch this space.

Despite the chaos, I think everybody had a good time, I certainly did.  Here’s a big thank you to Karen for hosting the event and to all those of you who came along and made it a success.  x

I’m looking forward to the next one, whatever we decide to do.  If anybody has anything specific that they would like to do get in touch and let us know…

Trinity Infinity Scarf

Trinity Knitted Scarf

Talk about lace knitting and many knitters will squeak quietly, retreat into a corner and hope nobody asks them about it.

It can be a very daunting challenge for the novice knitter. All those complicated stitches, in complicated patterns, with yarn that is so thin you can barely see it.

Lace doesn’t have to be like that though.  You don’t need many lace stitches to give a beautiful lace effect and is doesn’t have to be done with lace weight yarn.  After all, lace knitting is simply a matter of creating strategically placed holes in your work and holes are holes regardless of the thickness of the yarn.

Personally I love lace, but then I love complicated stuff in any form, I can’t help it. More satisfying than creating my own complicated stuff though, is helping others to gain a bit more confidence with the complicated stuff too.

So, back to the project in question.  The Trinity Scarf.  It’s a lace infinity scarf, made a bit thicker than normal and with an easy pattern repeat.  Don’t panic about the infinity bit, all that means is that the ends are joined together to give you one complete loop, which doesn’t need to be complicated at all.

I believe I actually made this scarf well over a year ago with the intention of using it in a beginner workshop and it has been sat on my desk ever since, waiting for me to write the pattern up.  I don’t know why it has taken me so long, I guess I have quite a large pile of work on my desk and this one kept escaping back to the bottom.  That’ssuch a lame excuse, but no longer, it’s finished now.

The pattern is only four rows and the main stitch repeat is only eleven stitches. That’s right, just four rows and a handful of stitches, so no getting lost in massive lace charts or having to write down every single row.  The rows don’t even take that long to do.  There are lace patterns I have done in the past with 500+ stitches on a row which have taken me up to half an hour to do one row.  It’s a bit demoralising when you go to bed after an hour of knitting and you’ve only done two rows.  Not with this pattern.

Trinity Knitted Lace Scarf by Wool Monkey

Here’s a brief look at what the stitches look like.

The other thing I love about this pattern is that it is very versatile.  You can easily make it as long or as wide as you like.  The instructions are all there and easy to do.  Plus, it’s worked in DK yarn, giving you a whole World of choice about what yarn to use.  I used Rowan Alpaca Colour for mine, mainly because I had it to hand, but also because of the lovely and very gradual changes in colour that is gives.   Of course, it’s also lovely and soft because it’s alpaca!

It’s totally your choice what you use and it doesn’t use a lot of yarn, so you can afford to be extravagant if you wish.  I think  something with a little bit of weight to it is nice, as it gives  a good drape, but then again, you could go for the light and airy feel…

If you do want to complicate things then there is of course one way to make the pattern tricky.  When you knit your scarf you have the option to either sew your ends together to make the infinity, or GRAFT your ends together.  I can picture some of you shuddering at the thought, or looking at me slightly bewildered.Trinity Knitted Lace Scarf by Wool Monkey

Grafting is a form of sewing up, but in such a way that you try to create a row of extra stitches between the two pieces which completely hide the join.  If you’ve never had a go before try it, with two pieces of stocking stitch first, so that you have an idea of what it is all about.  There are plenty of instructions out there on the web that should help you get started.  Eventually I will post some notes in the tutorials section, but I haven’t written them yet, sorry about that. Be warned though, that when it comes to grafting lace stitches things can get a bit gritty.  Be prepared for a lot of concentration and most likely a little bit of creative language to go with it.

So, if you would like to have a go, the pattern is available from my Etsy shop

Trinity Lace Scarf Knitting Pattern

Or, if you have any questions, do get in touch, it’s always good to hear from you.

Happy knitting!

Trinity Knitted Lace Scarf by Wool Monkey
Trinity Knitted Lace Scarf by Wool Monkey

 

If you would like to try a little more lace knitting then I know several people who found this book really useful…   (click on the link below for more info)

Old Favourite – Children’s Poncho

Sometimes the old fashioned stuff just works the best.

Just a simple granny crochet poncho, with a little bit of detail.

Kid's Granny Style Crochet Poncho

 

I created this little poncho number whilst I was running my Wool Monkey shop as I had a high demand for poncho patterns one winter.  I thought there was a need out there for a really simple, kids, crochet poncho.  I never expected it to be such a hit, but it has turned out to be one of my most popular patterns ever since.

I think on this occasion I owe a fair amount of credit to my youngest daughter.  She chose the colours that I used to make the poncho and she did a very good job of modelling the poncho for me once it was finished.  She looked super sweet and posed like a super star. Sometimes she is good like that.  Sometimes she is far from it!

Kid's Granny Style Crochet Poncho

She has become quite accustomed to modelling things that her Mummy has made now, although often she thinks she will get to keep them afterwards.  (This is not usually the case).  Sadly she’s getting bigger though and even though she is still, in my eyes at least, very cute, she is far from being a photogenic toddler anymore!   I could do with a replacement.  That most definitely does NOT mean I will be having anymore children however!

I think I have made this poncho several times over now in many different yarns and colours, for many different children.  It turns out that even boys quite like ponchos too.

It’s also quite an easy one to adjust the size too, just keep crocheting until it fits. It really is very simple.  I guess it is still true that simple things often work the best. It’s been a while since I made one now, maybe that’s what I shall do this weekend.  If you would like the pattern to make your own, it is still available on Etsy and hopefully will be for a long time to come.

Kids Simple V Crochet Poncho Pattern

 

The only problem patterns like this create for me, is what to create next to keep up with it?  Maybe I should ask my daughter what she thinks I should make…

Kid's Basic V Granny Crochet Poncho

 

 

Here are a couple of books that I have found contain some really good children’s crochet patterns too:    (click on the images to go look inside the books)

 

Baby Sunshine Blanket

OK, so I admit, I really enjoyed making my Moroccan Desert Blanket sooooooo much that I have made a new version.  I couldn’t help myself. I wasn’t entirely sure what size it was going to be when I started, or how the colours were going to work, but just had to start it.

Crochet Baby Sunshine Blanket by Wool Monkey

This new one was a little bit quicker though and grew so fast that I didn’t have much chance to think about the colours.

For starters it was made using chunky yarn and it’s only baby/toddler sized.  Hence, it didn’t take me twelve months to make it, it took less than two weeks.

It was still very addictive to make though, I could happily have made it bigger!  Crochet Baby Sunshine Blanket by Wool Monkey

The stitch I used is the same as the stitch used in the Moroccan Desert Blanket, Houndstooth check, in three colours.  The only real difference is the yarn and the sizing.  I have written up the pattern for this one too though, for those of you who prefer quicker projects!

Baby Sunshine Blanket Pattern

As this blanket grew, I realised that the colours were getting very bright.  Probably too bright for most adults.  But for kids it’s perfect. Eventually the colour pattern started to look a bit like a rainbow and my kids love it so much that I am now pondering making one for them.  Which of course would turn into two blankets for them as they fight over everything.

I do love working with bright colours, it’s a bit frivolous, but is really good for cheering you up on gloomy winter evenings.

The yarn I used is Schachenmayr Boston Sun, a chunky blend of cotton and acrylic and it gives the blanket a wonderful, slightly heavy, floppy feel to it. It’s not a commonly used yarn, but I would recommend you give it a go if you haven’t tried it before.  Youcould of course make the blanket in whatever you fancy.  But, chunky works well, as it grows so fast!

Here it is in all it’s finished glory!

Crochet Baby Sunshine Blanket by Wool Monkey
Crochet Baby Sunshine Blanket by Wool Monkey

 

Here is the yarn, Boston Sun, which I used for the blanket and a couple of alternatives.  (click on the images to find a price)

 

84,900 stitch blanket

About this time last year, I had finished all my crochet projects and was looking for something new to do.  So, I thought, I know I’ll do a new blanket, (I like making blankets). A nice quick stitch, so it doesn’t take too long.  Maybe I’ll have a look at what random colours I have lying around and see what matches up…

I found that I had loads of colours that when put together reminded me of Morocco.

Crochet Moroccan Desert Blanket Pattern Inspiration

The colour palette looked like it had just come straight out of a desert bazaar. I decided upon an old fashioned hounds tooth stitch in three colours and thought I might do a kind of gradual colour progression. Shouldn’t take too long.

Famous last words.

As ever I didn’t bother with a pattern, I just make it up as I am going along.  I wanted a nice big blanket, so I did my foundation chain nice and long.  Ooops.  Perhaps a bit too long this time.  Nevermind I thought, I ‘ll carry on anyway and make this a really big blanket!  I was enjoying the simplicty of it and the three colour, changing pattern was working well.

Crochet Moroccan Desert Blanket

 

And then of course, other projects interfered.  So the blanket got shelved temporarily. This seems to happen to me a lot when I am making blankets.  Quicker shorter projects, usually requests by other people always have a habit of taking priority over what I really want to do.

 

So, late spring came and went and then finally, during the summer I had a few weeks of working on my blanket again. It grew quite quickly too, considering how wide it was.  When I sat on the sofa working on it, it almost covered my feet now. This would have been great if it was winter and it wasn’t making me so warm!

Crochet Moroccan Desert Blanket Pattern

And then the inevitable happened and it got shelved again.  There was a small part of me that was starting to wonder just how big this blanket was going to end up. I really had done the rows far too long and at the moment it was a long thin rectangle. I was going to have to do soooo many more rows to make it balance out.  Hmmm.  More yarn was going to be needed.

Well, suddenly it was December and miraculously I didn’t have any other projects to work on.  None.   I was down to just my blanket.  This is a true rarity as I usually have at least four projects on the go.  So, one final push and I thought I could finish it by Christmas.  I’d forgotten how big it was. After a week or so of working on it I needed more yarn.  Which I promptly used up.  It wasn’t big enough.  So I found some more yarn.  Still not big enough.

Crochet Moroccan Desert Blanket Pattern

Eventually, the week after Christmas I made a decision that enough was enough and once I had finished the colours I was using that I would stop.

Sometimes it’s hard to stop when you’re enjoying making a blanket.  The temptation to make it just a little bit bigger creeps up on you…

I’m not sure what it is about this blanket that I love, other than that it has kept my legs warm throughout December, but I think it is going to become one of my favourites.  The texture is really lovely.  It doesn’t feel like a crocheted blanket, it feels like a woven blanket, with a dense and fabric-like structure to it.  The colour patterning is so simple, yet looks really effective.

So, now it’s January and I have finally finished the blanket.  Time to measure it.  It’s somewhat larger than I originally envisioned, being 175cm wide and 150cm long,  but that’s a bonus as it fits a double bed comfortably and you can get several people under it at once on the sofa. Then I had a thought about the number of stitches.  It’s not something I normally think about, but I got curious about how many stitches there were in my blanket.  So I worked it out.  I thought there might be quite a few but I wasn’t ready for 84,900. (give or take a couple).  Wow!  That’s a lot of stitches.  In fact that’s a seriously large number of stitches.  Makes it sound really impressive.  Made me wonder how many stitches, crochet or knitting, I do in a year. Think I’ll leave that calculation for another day.

Here it is, the finished item.  I have called it my Moroccan Desert Blanket.

Crochet Moroccan Desert Blanket Pattern

It’s definitely my favourite so far and very easy.  I might have to make another one.

If you fancy making one, I have put the pattern on Etsy and there is a brief video tutorial on the hounds tooth stitch in my tutorial section.

Moroccan Desert Blanket Crochet Pattern

You don’t have to make it a giant blanket, it is easy to adjust the size and make a smaller one.  Send us pics if you make any good ones.

Happy Crocheting!

Crochet Moroccan Desert Blanket Pattern

 

 

 

I used a mixture of yarns in the blanket above, but here are some of my favourites.  (click on the images to find links to the yarns)

 

Knitting for Charity

So, Christmas is over and like many of us you might have spent the last few months knitting Christmas presents for friends and relatives.  It’s something we all do from time to time when we feel the need to be creative and need an excuse to make things. Plus, it’s nice to give presents that you’ve made.  But then suddenly, after Christmas, you have fulfilled all your gift requirements and no longer have any projects to make.  Panic!

You need a new project, fast.  But what?

Well, nobody you know needs anything and you already have a full wardrobe of woolly goodies, so how about making something for somebody unknown?  Somebody who needs anything you can give because they have nothing. Or, somebody who needs a bit of a hand up in life.  After all the excesses of Christmas maybe a bit of charity would be good for the soul.

knit-for-charoy2

Knitting, or crocheting for charity is a lovely thing to do.  There is nothing more soothing when you’re in a bad place than something warm and cosy, handmade by somebody else and filled with love.  It offers comfort and sometimes a bit of hope that the future is not always going to be bleak. Plus of course, the good feelings and sense of well being that it generates for you.  Sometimes you can be in need of that warm cosy feeling just as much as the person receiving your knitting, you just don’t realise it. Like I said, it’s good for the soul.

So, there are many different ways you can join in. Blankets, hats, clothing, twiddle mats, toys to name but a few. There are lots of organisations out there asking for donations and it’s up to you to decide how you think you could best contribute, but here are just a few things to consider before you go leaping in headfirst.

Check your Charity.  By this I mean do a bit of research and find out about the charity that you are going to donate to.  Make sure they are real, that their motives are genuine and that all your hard work is going to get to the people that need it the most and not be wasted or worse. Most organisations have websites and you can also check their status using the charities register and similar.

Make sure that the charity wants knitted or crocheted items.  (Some don’t).  Look for any specific requirements they have for particular items or  sizes and make sure that what they want is something that you want to make.  Don’t put yourself in a position where the making suddenly becomes a burden for you.  Also check if they have any specific yarn requirements, such as acrylic or machine washable or similar that you need to consider before starting.

Lastly, be aware that they are not going to pay you to donate your work to them.  You are going to have to cover the cost yourself.  Don’t set out to create a pure wool blanket for refugees in Syria for example, without taking into account not only how much the yarn is going to cost you, but also any postage costs you might have to incur to get your item to the charity!  If you’re lucky you may be able to get somebody else to donate you some yarn. Local businesses or a friend who has her great grandma’s stash in the loft but never learnt to knit maybe.  Don’t be afraid to ask around, give somebody else the chance to get in on the act and you may be surprised how many people will want to contribute.  You could also team up with others, spread the cost and the work and make it a group project!

So, if you fancy a go, here are a few ideas for you to think about and websites that you might find interesting.

knit-for-peace

This is a great organisation, which I have worked for on several occasions.  They always have lots of projects on the go, for a large variety of different causes, often with patterns available for you to use for free and loads of interesting stuff on their website.  I can highly recommend going and having a peek.  It might just spark your interest with projects you never knew existed.

Knit for Peace

knit-a-square-new_0

 

The knit a square group is a great one to get involved in if you would like your projects to be really quick and simple. Lots of my regular customers from the Wool Monkey shop used to bring me squares on a regular basis to send away to these guys. They have ladies who then sew all the squares into blankets to be sent away and handed out in places where they are needed. They also have requests for other items too, always with instructions and patterns to help you get started. This is a great project for beginners, knitting squares is a good way to practice.

http://www.knit-a-square.com/

 

loving-hands

 

Loving Hands is a bit more of a forum type group, who focus onbringing like-minded crafters together to create for charities.  They aim to make sure that all handmade work goes directly to the people/animals who need it.  They have lots of information on local groups, free patterns and projects to join in with.

http://www.lovinghands.org.uk

I could go on listing all the charities that need knitted items all day, but then this blog would become rather long.  But, you get the idea, that there is more out then than what you perhaps first thought.  A simple google search brings up hundreds of different ones. Or, you can visit the UK Hand Knitting Association website, where there is a list of charities for you to have a nosey at.

http://www.ukhandknitting.com/knitting-for-charity

 

I hope some of this sparks a new interest for you, so that your crafty hands don’t get bored. If you need anymore help or are unsure with any of it, get in touch and I’ll see if I can help you out.

Happy crafting!

 

twiddle-mats

 

 

 

 

Hexagons Galore

Sometimes I have to invent a new blanket, just to try something out that I haven’t done before. Sometimes I have to invent a new blanket just to try out a certain set of colours.

I have crocheted plenty of hexagons before, but can’t remember making them into a blanket before.  To be honest, I think I just got the urge to make a big hexagon blanket in repeating colours for a change.

So, I started making hexagons.  Then I continued making hexagons.  Then I made a few more hexagons. Then I had a pile of hexagons.

Crochet Hexagon Wool Blanket

I had reached that point where you start to think to yourself,  ” shall I sew some of these together now, so that I don’t have to do them all at once at the end?”.    This was closely followed by wondering if I should block the hexagons first.  It would make it easier to sew them together.  But then, wouldn’t it be better if I could block them all to be exactly the same size.  Imagine how much more straightforward that would be!

I was considering a polystyrene block and some cocktail sticks.  I thought I could pin them out on the block, one after the other, leaving the sticks in place so that each one ended up the same size. The only problems being that I didn’t have an appropriate piece of polystyrene and it would probably take longer to block the hexagons one by one than it was going to take me to crochet the whole blanket.  In the end  I had to ask my ‘other half’ if he had any polystyrene, which then meant that I had to explain to him what I was up to. That’s not usually a good thing.   He gave me that look that seems to imply that he thinks I am embarking on yet another mad, destined for disaster scheme. Then he told me to wait a couple of hours and he would find something.

A couple of hours later, plus a bit and look what I had!

Crochet Hexagon Wool Blanket Blocking

My very own, custom made, hexagon blocking device.  With bamboo skewers instead of cocktail sticks and hard MDF board with ready drilled holes instead of polystyrene.  The best bit too, is the fact that I could block a dozen hexagons all at once. Woohoo!

Crochet Hexagon Wool Blanket

 

 

My blocked hexagons were perfect.

 

 

 

All I need to do now is drill a few more holes in my new toy and then I can block other shapes and sizes too.  I had never seen anything like this for sale anywhere before and thought that there could be a market for them out there somewhere…  Well, maybe one day, but for now you have the idea, so at least you can make your own if you want to try it out.

Well, time to get sewing hexagons.  31 hexagons to be precise. It was surprisingly quick and enjoyable once they were all so neatly blocked.  Happy blanket making!

Crochet Hexagon Wool Blanket

If you are interested in the pattern for the blanket, it will be available on Etsy fairly soon.  Alternatively, the blanket itself is now for sale.

Hexagon Blanket