Quick Crochet Ear Warmer

The quick knitted ear warmer had been such a success that I decided to create another one. This time how ever it is crocheted.  I haven’t been doing much crochet lately and thought it was about time I did!

Plus, the knitted one I made has been claimed by my youngest daughter. She seems to think it is hers now, so I need another one for my ears too.

I have used the same yarn as I used for the knitted ear warmer, Mirasol Sulka, but in a slightly different colour.  It is a lovely chunky yarn, made with a blend of wool, alpaca and silk.  It’s really soft.  Mmmmmmm.

So, here it is, ear warmer pattern number two!  It’s a slightly shaped pattern again, to fit around your head nice and snug, using just a few basic crochet stitches.

Off we go.

Once again, I suggest you measure your head, or the head that you are making the ear warmer for if it’s not your own.  The one I am making is designed to fit a head of between 55 and 58cm.  This is measured around the head from the back, just above your hairline, over the tops of the ears and to the front, around the hairline.  Or, if you want your ear warmer to sit differently then measure around where you want it to sit.  I find it is best to reduce the size by a small amount so that it fits nice and snug and doesn’t fall  down – not too tight though! Then if you need to make it bigger or smaller you can add in or take out some rows on the widest part.  I have pointed out where to do this in the pattern below.  If you are not sure how to work out how many rows you need to change by then have a look at my previous blog on the Quick Knitted Ear Warmer.  All the calculation detail is there.

The tension I am using for this pattern is approximately 14 stitches and 15 rows per 10cm square, using double crochet stitch and a 5.0mm hook.  You can create a small square and count your rows and stitches to check this if you think you need to.  Your tension does not need to be perfect, but it needs to be close enough that your ear warmer works out roughly the right size.

Firstly, you will need some chunky yarn and a 5.0mm crochet hook.  Any yarn can be used.  I used the skein of Mirasol Sulka above, which is lovely and soft and warm, but you can use any chunky weight yarn you fancy. You will only need about 50g.

These are the abbreviations for the stitches used in the pattern;

ch  –  chain           dc  – double crochet  (this is sc, single crochet in US terms)           

dc inc  – do two dc stitches into one stitch  (increase)

dc2tog  – work two dc stitches together into one stitch  (decrease)

st / sts   – stitch / stitches

I will show you how to do these increases and decreases later on.

Let’s get going.

 

With your 5.0mm hook, create 9ch sts.  (Not too tight)

Turn your work and start to work back down your chain sts.

Row 1 –  1dc into 2nd ch stitch from hook (see picture), dc into each of the remaining 7 ch sts, 1ch , turn.  You should have 8 dc sts and 1ch.

Miss out the first chain (1) and start working into the second chain (2).

Row 2  – 1dc into the second stitch on the row (see first picture below), dc into each st across the row including a st into the ch you missed at the beginning of row 1 (see second picture below) , 1ch, turn.   (you should have 8sts all together – the turning chain at the end of each row counts as 1 stitch)

Start by working into stitch 2
Do the last stitch on the row into the chain stitch at the end of Row 1

Repeat row 2 a further 10 times.

Row 3 – 1dc inc into 2nd st on row (see picture below), 1dc into each of next 4 sts, 1dc inc into next st, 1 dc into last st on row( turning chain st from previous row) , 1ch, turn.    (you should now have 10sts)

dc inc – do your first stitch in the row below, then do another stitch in exactly the same place, so you have 2 stitches together

Row 4 – 1dc into the second stitch on the row, dc into each st across the row including a st at the end into the turning ch from the row below , 1ch, turn.  (10sts)

Repeat row 4 another 2 times.

Row 5 – 1dc inc into 2nd st on row (increase same as Row 3), 1dc into each of next 6 sts, 1dc inc into next st, 1 dc into last st on row( turning chain st from previous row) , 1ch, turn.    (you should now have 12sts)

Repeat row 5 another 44 times.

This is the part of the pattern where if you want to increase or decrease the size of the ear warmer then you can add or subtract your extra rows.  All you need to do is change the number of repeats of row 5 by the number of rows you need to adjust by.

Time to decrease again.

Row 6 – dc2tog (this is done using the 2nd st on the row and the 3rd st on the row), 1dc into each of the next 6 sts, dc2tog (using the next 2 sts on the row), 1dc into the turning ch from the row below , 1ch, turn. (you should now have 10sts).

Here is a little help with the dc2tog in case you have never done one before.

So, at the beginning of your decrease row, you are going to start by inserting your hook into the 2nd stitch on the row, just like every other row, wrap your yarn around your hook and draw it back out so that you then have 2 loops on your hook (pic 1).     Next, insert your hook straight into the next (3rd) stitch on the row, wrap your yarn and draw out another loop so that you now have 3 loops on your hook (pic 2).   Then wrap your yarn around your hook again and draw it through all three of the loops on your hook (pic 3).  You then have a finished decrease stitch (pic 4) and have reduced two stitches into one.

I hope that made sense!   If not then have a look at the video in the learning zone, it might help.

Let’s carry on with the pattern again.

Row 7 – 1dc into the second stitch on the row, dc into each st across the row including a st at the end into the turning ch from the row below , 1ch, turn.  (10sts)

Repeat row 7 another 2 times.

Row 8 – dc2tog (this is done using the 2nd st on the row and the 3rd st on the row), 1dc into each of the net 4 sts, dc2tog (using the next 2 sts on the row), 1dc into the turning ch from the row below , 1ch, turn. (you should now have 8sts).

Row 9 – 1dc into the second stitch on the row, dc into each st across the row including a st at the end into the turning ch from the row below , 1ch, turn.  (8sts)

Repeat row 9 another 9 times.  Fasten off yarn.   Leave a tail long enough to sew the ends of your ear warmer together.

There you go, you have finished your ear warmer.  You just need to sew the ends together and then sew in any loose ends and it is ready to wear.

It’s keeping my ears warm today – whilst I do a spot of gardening in the cold and damp.

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